About SFZCCity CenterGreen GulchTassajara


 
Support Zen Center
Become a Member
HomeTassajaraZen Practice and Training at TassajaraStudy Weeks

Without Hindrance There is No Fear: Living Without Walls

Related Information
Ryotan Cynthia Kear
Sarita Tamayo-Moraga
with Ryotan Cynthia Kear and Sarita Tamayo-Moraga
June 13-17 (Thursday-Monday)

The Heart Sutra is central to our Zen practice. Central to this sutra is the wisdom (prajna paramita) that engenders no hindrance leading to no fear. As Red Pine translates: “Thus the Bodhisattva lives this Prajna Paramita with no walls in the mind. No walls, therefore no fear." Imagine a life without hindrance, without walls, without fear. Can you? What is the perfect wisdom, the prajna paramita, that leads to such a possibility? And how do we live it?

Join Cynthia Kear, Sarita Tamayo-Moraga and our intimate sangha, as we explore, with body-mind-heart, this Sutra. In the morning, students will join the residential community for the morning meditation program, breakfast, work practice and lunch. Afternoons and evenings will include study sessions, lectures, and opportunities to meet with the teachers individually. There will be ample personal time to enjoy the baths, creek and hiking trails, to rest and renew. Dinner is in the guest dining room.

Retreat fees: The rate for Study Week is $68 per person, per day for shared guest accommodations. If you are traveling with a companion, private rooms are available for two.The rate for Study Week is $68 per person, per day for shared guest accommodations. If you are traveling with a companion, private rooms are available for two.

Related Bio(s):

Ryotan Cynthia Kear

Cynthia Kear has been practicing Soto Zen Buddhism for twenty-five years. As a full-time employee with an active family, she appreciates how demanding life can be. “Everywhere practice,” infusing the everyday “marketplace” of our lives with space, awareness, stability and ease, is her primary interest.

Sarita Tamayo-Moraga

Sarita Tamayo-Moraga, Ph.D. is a Zen priest and Dharma heir in the Suzuki-roshi lineage. She began practicing meditation and studying with Darlene Cohen in 1999. Sarita was debilitated by a chronic repetitive strain injury soon after she began sitting. This life-changing injury led her to connect with Darlene’s emphasis on chronic illness as a way to penetrate suffering. She continued to work with Darlene until her death around the transformation of suffering in the body and through the body with zazen as the primary focal point.